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Cotto Law Firm P.C.

Child Support Lawyer in Scottsdale, AZ

Factors that apply to the child support guidelines include:

  • Time spent caring for the child, both for the parent the child primarily lives with and the non-residential parent
  • Each parent’s income or potential income
  • The cost of daycare and health insurance


The state mandates that these guidelines apply to all natural-born children, even if the parents were never married, and to all adopted children. Additionally, the legal system puts a higher priority on paying child support over all other financial obligations.


Win Your Case


If you’re worried that your child’s other parent won’t live up to their obligations, or if you’re worried that he or she might try to force you to pay more than you can, speak with our experienced child support lawyer. We can help you understand the laws that apply to your case and plan out what action to take.


To schedule a reduced-rate initial consultation, call us at (480) 429-3700. We’re ready to listen to you so we can understand your circumstances and get started. Contact us today to begin.

Contact

Phone Number:  (480) 429-3700

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6991 E. Camelback Rd., Suite C230

Scottsdale, Arizona 85251

Location

Child Support

A dad holding his baby after getting help from a child support lawyer in Scottsdale, AZ

If you’re separated from your child’s other parent, and you’re worried about child support, contact Cotto Law Firm P.C. Our child support lawyer, Sylvina Cotto, will help you understand what to expect and what to do next so you can get the best results for your own finances and for your child’s wellbeing.

We’re based in Scottsdale, AZ, and we provide service to the surrounding areas.


​Learn About Child Support


Arizona’s courts provide child support guidelines that determine how much parents pay. Generally, the courts follow an income shares model, meaning that the total monthly child support from both parents should equal what the cost of raising a child together would have been. The courts then split this amount so that each parent pays a proportional amount.