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Cotto Law Firm P.C.

When you are going through a divorce in the Scottsdale, AZ, area, it’s best to seek the help of an experienced divorce lawyer sooner rather than later. The earlier you can get our divorce lawyer on your side, the better your negotiation ability will be.

Cotto Law Firm P.C. wants you to be successful in your divorce case, and we will work hard to ensure your rights are upheld. Contact us today to learn more about Arizona divorce laws that may apply to you and to schedule your consultation. 

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Going through a divorce is almost always a difficult and turbulent situation to find yourself in. Even when both parties agree that the break may be for the best, there is still the matter of separating all viable assets adequately and making decisions on other legal matters such as child custody. To make sure your divorce proceeds smoothly, call the experts at Cotto Law Firm P.C. in Scottsdale, AZ, today.


We have over 20 years of experience handling cases like yours, so you know you’ll be in good hands. Trust Sylvina Cotto as your divorce lawyer: call (480) 429-3700 to ask any questions or to schedule your consultation.

Experienced Divorce Lawyer in Scottsdale

Experienced Divorce Lawyer in Scottsdale, AZ

6991 E. Camelback Rd., Suite C230

Scottsdale, Arizona 85251

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There are two main points you should know about Arizona divorce law as you start the divorce process. The first is that Arizona is a no-fault state. In a no-fault state, neither member of a relationship has to prove any wrongdoing in order to file for a divorce. Instead, all that is required is for one party to claim that the marriage is “irretrievably broken.”

The second and perhaps even more essential part of Arizona divorce law you should understand is that Arizona is a community-property state. This means that during a divorce, all assets obtained during the marriage are considered community belongings and are required to be split fairly between the divorce participants, no matter whose name was used for the purchase. In this case, “fairly” typically means “equally.”